DIY Kegerator Converted Freezer

I built this DIY kegerator after I finally got tired of bottling my home-brew. Once you make the jump from 5-gallon batches to 10 or 15 gallons you’ll really see what I mean. It has saved me so much time kegging instead of bottling, and I have more control over my beer making, storage, and carbonation levels. You can even use this to lager if you want too, I made a tasty California common after I built it. I’m going to give you the basics on how to make one of this Kegerator (Keezer) in this post.

This is what I’m going to show you how to build.

DIY Kegerator

But first you need a few items…

Corny Keg

Corny Keg (Ball Locks)

CO2 tank

CO2 Tank

Blank Chest Freezer

Deep Freezer

Tavern Heads, Gas Lines, Beer Lines, Ball (or Pin) Locks, and Temp Controller

Tavern Heads, Gas Lines, Beer Lines, Ball (or Pin) Locks, and Temp Controller

After you have these items you will need some paint (whatever color you want), wood (1×6 or 2×6) at least 8ft, and some basic tools: Saw, Screw Driver, Hammer, Nails, and STRONG glue.

The first thing you do is remove the freezer lid (leave the hinges attached to the lid not the body).

Next get your measurements to cut your wood. You are building a box to go around the top of the freezer like in the first picture. So you need to measure that distance around your freezer and then cut your wood accordingly.

Paint your Freezer and it’s lid.

Fiancee helping paint freezer

Fiancee helping paint freezer

Then paint your wood, and then make a box that will be glued on the top of your lidless freezer.

Lip Boards

Before you glue your box to the top of your freezer drill your holes for your Tavern Heads (faucets) to go through and put them on. Make sure to drill a small hole in the very back of the box that faces the wall (only 1/8in thick), will explain later.

Before you glue! Drill holes and attach hardware

Before you glue! Drill holes and attach hardware

Put some weight on the box while the glue dries (make sure you use super strong glue!)

Reattach the lid, hook up your corny keg and CO2 tank and test your pressure and beer flow.

Testing is fun!

Testing is fun!

Then run your Temp Gage probe through the small hole you made earlier. This is what will allow you to set the temperature you want in your new DIY Kegerator Keezer. Set your temp, and then plug your freezer in through the temp gage. You can find one here.

I also built some shelves to house my beer glassware.

Glassware Shelf

Glassware Shelf

I attached the shelving to the wall and then slid my new converted freezer, now Keezer kegerator into the shelves.

Check it out my DIY Kegerator is done…

Kegged Home Brew

Kegged Home Brew

If you decide to make a kegerator let me know how it turns out. Good luck!

 

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